This BDSM Carpenter Builds Furniture for Spanking and Flogging

bondage-furniture

By Mark Hay,

Saxon Dungeon Furniture specializes in custom bondage tables, crosses, and horses that can cost as much as $5,000.

In the post–50 Shades of Grey era, kinky tools and toys have moved from the obscure to the mainstream. You can find restraints like gags or shackles and punishment tools like floggers or clamps in any sex shop—even on Walmart.com. But step into a full-on BDSM dungeon, and you’re apt to stumble upon some truly unexpected contraptions. Dommes have any number of specialized hooks and straps. But it’s often the BDSM furniture that stands out: stocks and crosses, metal cages and medical-style equipment, fucking machines and giant latex sheets equipped with vacuum suction to wrap skin tight around a submissive.

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You won’t even find these hulking apparatuses in kink-catering stores. These products are made by fetish-centric craftspeople. I caught up recently with one of these kink specialists. His name is Simon, and he is the carpenter behind Saxon Dungeon Furniture, a well-regarded maker of high-quality wooden bondage chairs, crosses, straddles, tables, and walls. He told me about how he fell into this work, how surprisingly easy it was for him to build a client base, and how he decides what to build and sell.

dungeon-furniture

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VICE: How did you decide to start making fetish furniture?

Simon: I did an apprenticeship when I was 16 or 17 in cabinet making. I’m 50 now. It’s all I’ve ever done, and I’ve done a bit of everything. I saw online [while searching randomly about a decade ago] what’s available. Most of it was not very high quality. So I just thought, Why not?

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What specific shortcomings did you see in most of the fetish furniture on the market, and how did you think you could stand out amongst all the other providers?

Somebody may make a piece of furniture. Let’s say a [St. Andrew’s] Cross. They make it out of two-by-six spruce framing lumber, which will be crudely sanded and assembled. So you’re getting poor quality species of wood, badly fitted together, and not very well finished.

There seems to be a standard range of designs… Usually, you come up with things within the parameters of what’s out there because you know what people want. But I keep the quality high. I stand out from the rest with my experience [in carpentry]. Even a standard cross, I make it out of better materials. I will make it out of hard maple or cherry. The way it’s constructed, and the finish I apply is superior. I design stuff so that it can be semi-dismantled, easily shipped, [and] re-assembled. But it’s not rugged. I’ve never had a quality complaint in all of these years.

Read the full interview on VICE